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Autumn Methods Workshops 2021

Organised by the Faculty of Social Sciences Autumn 2021

The Faculty of Social Sciences offers nine Autumn Workshops in Methods and Methodologies from early September through late October 2021. These are for teachers, researchers, and PhD candidates who desire to continue to broaden and deepen their knowledge of research methods.

Early sign-up period ended on June 20, and we have a very limited number of available spots left. If you are interested in attending any of the Autumn Methods Workshops, please join the waiting list by submitting this form by August 15. You will be notified within a couple weeks after the deadline if you get a spot in the workshop(s) you would like to attend. 

Please direct any unanswered questions related to the content of the workshops to christopher [dot] swader [at] soc [dot] lu [dot] se and nils [dot] gustafsson [at] isk [dot] lu [dot] se. For questions related to practical concerns, email elisabet [dot] ottosson [at] sam [dot] lu [dot] se and yagmur [dot] yilmaz [at] sam [dot] lu [dot] se.

Workshop fees

  • All workshops are free-of-charge for all Lund University PhD students. 
  • All workshops are free-of-charge for LU Faculty of Social Sciences staff and the members of the LU COMPUTE Research School (co-sponsor of several workshops).
  • For other cases, please sign up with your interest, and we will provide you with fee information, or send an email.

Location

It is planned that the workshops will take place on campus (see below for details) in accordance with the general guidelines and recommendations of the Swedish Public Health Agency. The participants are asked to arrive and leave at the times specified below and maintain social distancing in order to reduce the risk of Covid-19 infection. The participants will be notified in case there are any changes in the workshop format.


Autumn Workshops in Methods and Methodologies

You may sign up for more than one workshop: their schedules do not conflict.

The opportunities (4 qualitative and 5 quantitative workshops) are:

Qualitative methods workshops:
 

1. Qualitative Analysis and Coding using NVivo

Instructor: Tullia Jack, Aalborg University, Department of Sociology
Dates: 18–22 October (week 42), PC/Mac groups split into mornings and afternoons
Time: 9:15-12:00 (PC group) and 13:15-16:00 (Mac group)
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info (PC group)
Click here for the schedule and location info (Mac group)

2. Process Tracing methods

Instructor: Derek Beach, Aarhus University, Department of Political Science
Dates: 25–29 October (week 43), afternoons
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

3. Focus Group Interviews

Instructor: Nils Gustafsson, Lund University, Department of Strategic Communication
Dates: 4–7 October (week 40), afternoons
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

4. Using Photographs within the Interview Setting

Instructor: Åsa Thelander, Lund University, Department of Strategic Communication
Dates: 11 & 13 October (week 41), afternoons
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Quantitative methods workshops:

5. Introduction to Python

Instructor: Nils Holmberg, Lund University, Department of Strategic Communication
Dates: 27 September–1 October (week 39), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

6. Introduction to R

Instructor: Irina Vartanova, Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm
Dates: 4–8 October (week 40), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

7. Introduction to Topic Modeling using R

Instructor: Sofiya Voytiv, University of Tampere, Institute for Futures Studies
Dates: 11–12 October (week 41), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

8. Survey Experiments in the Social Sciences

Instructor: Hanna Bäck, Lund University, Department of Political Science & Emma Renström, University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology
Dates: 27–28 October (week 43), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

9. Crash Course in Basic Statistics

Instructor: Joost van der Weijer, Lund University, Humanities Lab
Dates: 6, 8, 10, 13, & 15 September (weeks 36-37), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info


Workshop descriptions

1. Qualitative Analysis and Coding using NVivo

Instructor: Tullia Jack, Aalborg University, Department of Sociology
Dates: 18–22 October (week 42), PC/Mac groups split into mornings and afternoons
Time: 9:15-12:00 (PC group) and 13:15-16:00 (Mac group)
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info (PC group)
Click here for the schedule and location info (Mac group)

Abstract: Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software packages are promising for assisting with the analysis of qualitative data. But how to make the most of their potential? NVivo software is currently available for use for all Lund University researchers and teachers. This workshop will demonstrate how NVivo can help to address qualitative research problems, both in the abstract and via practical exercises. Over five half day sessions the workshop will familiarise participants with the NVivo interface, importing and coding various file types, cases and classifications, visualising data as well as running queries. These hands-on exercises will explore how NVivo can - not only store and sort data - but help you to make sense of empirical material, look for patterns and systematically illuminate your research questions.

About the instructor

Tullia Jack got through her PhD in sociology with quite some help from NVivo. Following graduation she spent some extra time experimenting with NVivo's capabilities, and after delivering various NVivo courses (including this one for the past two years) she is more convinced of NVivo's usefulness in organising, comparing and diving deep into different qualitative data sets.
 

2. Process Tracing methods

Instructor: Derek Beach, Aarhus University, Department of Political Science
Dates: 25–29 October (week 43), afternoons
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Abstract: Process tracing is a research method designed to learn how things work in real-world cases. Increasingly used across the social sciences and in applied policy evaluation, process tracing involves unpacking causal processes as they play out within cases and tracing them empirically, enabling within-case causal inferences about the processes that link causes and outcomes together.

The aim of this intensive course is to provide participants with a good working understanding of the core elements of process tracing as a distinct social science case study method, enabling you to utilize it in your own research either as a stand-alone method or in combination with other methods in multi-method designs such as experiments or small/medium-n comparisons using Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The course will combine pre-class readings with live sessions aimed at understanding the core elements of Process Tracing as a distinct case study method. Participants are encouraged to use their own research in short daily exercises to explore how Process Tracing methods can improve your own design.

The live sessions start by exploring the theory-side of what we are actually 'tracing' (i.e. theorized causal processes or mechanisms), followed by sessions on how causal processes can be traced empirically using 'mechanistic evidence’. The final session deals with case selection and how it can be combined with other methods. The sessions will combine lectures and discussions with small group work designed to better understand the method.

Headshot of Derek BeachAbout the instructor

Derek Beach is a professor of Political Science at Aarhus University in Denmark, where he teaches international relations, European integration and case study methodology. He has authored articles, chapters, and books on research methodology, policy evaluation, international negotiations and European integration. He co-authored the book Process-tracing Methods: Foundations and Guidelines (University of Michigan Press). He has taught qualitative case study methods at ECPR, IPSA and ICPSR summer and winter schools, held numerous workshops and seminars on qualitative methods throughout the world. He is an academic co-convenor of the ECPR Methods Schools, and will be an academic fellow at the World Bank’s Independent Expert Group in the fall.
 

3. Focus Group Interviews

Instructor: Nils Gustafsson, Lund University, Department of Strategic Communication
Dates: 4–7 October (week 40), afternoons
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Abstract: Focus group interviews can be extremely useful in qualitative research, especially when the inherent dynamics in a discussion among people are of value. In this four day workshop, we will learn about the history of the focus group as a method and its application in research. We will discuss different strategies in composing focus groups, how to think about interview guides, the prospect of online focus groups, and what role the moderator should take in guiding the discussion. The workshop will focus on the practicalities of the method, and will include training exercises where participants will conduct focus group interviews and analyze the ensuing transcripts in collaboration. Participants are encouraged to bring their own ongoing and planned research to the table.

Headshot of Nils GustafssonAbout the instructor

Nils Gustafsson is a political scientist and senior lecturer in strategic communication. Research interests include politics in relation to social media and elite networks. He is a champion of mixed-methods strategies and has used focus group interviews extensively in his research. He teaches political communication, theory of science, and quantitative as well as qualitative methods.
 

4. Using Photographs within the Interview Setting

Instructor: Åsa Thelander, Lund University, Department of Strategic Communication
Dates: 11 & 13 October (week 41), afternoons
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

To include photographs or other material can often enrich an interview and can be used in many studies. Photo elicitation interviews, interviewing in the presence of photographs, elicitation interviews, creative interviewing – there are many concepts used for strategies where some kind of device is included in the interview. In two workshop days we will learn and discuss these types of interviews with a focus on photographs. Different strategies for how to include photographs in an interview will be presented. The production, selection and role of the photographs in the interview will be discussed and problematized. The interview situation will be covered, such as the role of the interviewer and the interviewee as well as practical aspects. The analysis of such interviews will also be discussed. This workshop is particularly useful for participants with former experience as well as for those who consider using such interviews for the first time. 

Headshot of Åsa Thelander

About the instructor

Åsa Thelander is an Associate professor at the Department of Strategic Communication. She has extensive experience of using photographs in interviews from her research. She has authored articles, book chapters and edited books on qualitative methods and particularly on using photographs in interviews. She has taught qualitative methodology for many years to students at all levels. 
 

5. Introduction to Python

Instructor: Nils Holmberg, Lund University, Department of Strategic Communication
Dates: 27 September–1 October (week 39), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Abstract: In this introduction to Python for social scientists you will learn how to use the Python programming language as a unified platform for handling multiple tasks and workflows connected to running research studies, collecting data, and analyzing numeric and textual data. On the first day we will get familiarized with the Python command prompt, writing basic control structures, and utilizing the scipy stack (numpy, pandas, etc). On the second day, we will practice building an online survey experiment using psychopy package and collect data. The third day will be dedicated to performing basic statistics, data analysis and visualization with the seaborn package. On day four, we will use the spaCy package powered by machine learning libraries for various natural language processing applications. On the fifth and final day we will learn how to use jupyter notebooks and google colab for sharing and collaborating on Python code.

Headshot of Nils HolmbergAbout the instructor

Nils Holmberg has a doctoral degree in Media and Communication Science from Lund University in December 2016. The focus of his dissertation was to investigate the effects of web advertising on children aged 9-12 when they use the internet to solve different types of tasks, e.g. read and understand texts in an online newspaper. To investigate this, he used experimental methods to systematically vary the content and form of web ads. Physiological measuring equipment was then used to investigate how different advertising properties affected children's visual attention and ability to solve tasks online. He has used Python extensively over the years to collect and analyze data.
 

6. Introduction to R

Instructor: Irina Vartanova, Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm
Dates: 4–8 October (week 40), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Abstract: The workshop provides an introduction to R programming language for statistical data analysis in social sciences. R is an increasingly popular scientific tool and often becomes the first-choice software for implementing newly developed statistical methods. The main goal of the workshop is that participants learn the basic functionality of R language that covers the full cycle of statistical data analysis including data loading, pre-processing, visualisation, modelling, and communication of the results. The workshop is focused on the “tidyverse” collection of packages which are designed not just for the machine to execute but also for humans to read and thus are intuitive and easier to learn. The practical work is based on real data problems and prepares participants for a whole range of diverse data analysis tasks.

Headshot of Irina Vartanova

About the instructor

Irina Vartanova is a researcher at the Institute for Futures Studies. Having completed a PhD in psychology, she applies her data analysis expertise to working in an interdisciplinary environment and collaborating with colleagues from different fields. She specializes in advanced statistical and computational methods in social research and has a lot of experience in analyzing large survey data. Her research primarily focuses on social norms and how they change in different cultures. In her free time, she likes to learn new tricks to make her R code clearer and faster.
 

7. Introduction to Topic Modeling using R

Instructor: Sofiya Voytiv, University of Tampere, Institute for Futures Studies
Dates: 11–12 October (week 41), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Abstract: The growing use of social media as well as continuous digitalization of different types of texts in recent times open up new avenues for social research on a larger scale when it comes to text analysis. Topic modelling allows the researcher to find different topics and estimate their relationship with the metadata of the documents analyzed. During this introduction workshop we will learn what topic modelling implies, does and how it can be used to analyze different types of text data. R software will be used during the workshop; therefore, some knowledge of R is advantageous.

Headshot of Sofiya Voytiv

About the instructor

Sofiya Voytiv holds a PhD in sociology from Stockholm University (2020). She is a project researcher at the Tampere Peace Research Institute (Tampere University, Finland) and a researcher at the Institute for Future Studies (Stockholm, Sweden). Sofiya has experience in social network analysis and topic modelling as well as she is interested in mixed-methods approach in social sciences.
 

8. Survey Experiments in the Social Sciences

Instructor: Hanna Bäck, Lund University, Department of Political Science & Emma Renström, University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology
Dates: 27–28 October (week 43), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Abstract: Survey experiments have become a standard methodological tool in the social sciences. By combining experimental design enabling causal inference with the flexibility of the survey, survey experiments can be used to study a variety of questions related to the social sciences, for example focusing on how various features influence societal and political attitudes and behavior. The increased availability of online panels has also made it easier for scholars to perform online survey experiments using larger samples of participants. This two-(half)day workshop starts out by introducing survey experiments as a research method, and by showing some examples of such experiments performed within the field of political psychology. The workshop teaches participants how to use different survey experimental designs and how to address challenges related to stimuli and survey questionnaire construction. Participants will learn to balance the requirements from science to draw causal inferences and simultaneously consider the external validity of the stimulus material. The workshop focuses specifically on how to practically design a survey experiment, and the goal is that participants leave the workshop with an understanding of how survey experiments can provide useful causal inferences, knowledge of how to design an experiment, and the ability to apply these methods in their own research. 

Headshot of Hanna BäckHeadshot of Emma Renström

About the instructors

The workshop is led by Emma A. Renström, associate professor of psychology at Kristianstad University, and Hanna Bäck, professor of political science at Lund University. They have worked together for over 10 years within the field of political psychology and have extensive experience of using survey experiments to answer a range of research questions. Their research has for example explored how individuals become radicalized, what influences protest participation, and what drives affective polarization in society.
 

9. Crash Course in Basic Statistics

Instructor: Joost van der Weijer, Lund University, Humanities Lab
Dates: 6, 8, 10, 13, & 15 September (weeks 36-37), mornings
Format: Campus-based
Click here for the schedule and location info

Abstract: One aim of the social and the behavioural sciences is to give insight into characteristics in relatively large groups of individuals (usually called populations). These characteristics can be, for instance, opinions about issues, performance in particular situations, and so on. The individuals can be people in general, the inhabitants of a country, or members of a specific target group. 

The predominant strategy within the sciences is to measure the characteristic of interest in a small subset (usually called a sample), on the basis of which inferences are made about the population from which the sample was drawn. 

Statistical analysis is the tool for making this strategy possible. One aspect of this analysis is to give a concise description of the findings within the sample. The second aspect is to aid the researcher to generalize these findings to the population. In this subsidiary course, I will illustrate these processes using one or more concrete examples, and explain the terminology that is most commonly used within the analysis.

Headshot of Joost van der Weijer

About the instructor

Joost works as the Humanities Lab's methodologist. As part of this employment, he assists students and researchers in planning and implementing experiments and analyzing the results. He teaches an introductory and a follow-up course in the statistical analysis of experimental data. He also teaches modules in basic statistics and 'R' as part of the Faculty of Social Sciences' master of science programme in 'Social Scientific Data Analysis.'