Autumn Methods Workshops 2020

Organised by the Faculty of Social Sciences Autumn 2020

The Faculty of Social Sciences will offer eleven Autumn Workshops in Methods and Methodologies late September through October 2020. These are for teachers, researchers, and PhD candidates who desire to continue to broaden and deepen their knowledge of research methods. You may sign up for more than one workshop: their schedules do not conflict.

Workshop fees

  • All workshops are free-of-charge for all Lund University PhD students. 
  • All workshops are free-of-charge for LU Faculty of Social Sciences staff.
  • Workshops 9, 10, and 11 free-of-charge for all Lund University staff. 
  • For other cases, please sign up with your interest, and we will provide you with fee information, or send an email.

Location

A majority of the workshops will take place on campus (see below for details) in accordance with the general guidelines and recommendations of the Swedish Public Health Agency. The participants are asked to arrive and leave at the times specified below and maintain social distancing in order to reduce the risk of Covid-19 infection. The participants will be notified in case there are any changes in the workshop format.

Autumn Workshops in Methods and Methodologies.

The opportunities (5 qualitative, 1 hybrid, and 5 quantitative workshops) are:

Qualitative methods workshops:

1. Interpreting Interview Excerpts

Instructor: Malin Åkerström, Lund University, Department of Sociology
Dates: 21–22 September
Time: 13:15-16:00 on the 21st and 13:00-15:45 on the 22nd
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236

2. Critical Ethnography

Instructor: Helle Rydström, Lund University, Department of Gender Studies
Dates: 24–25 September
Time: 9:15-12:00 and 13:15-16:00 on the 24th and 9:00-11.45 and 13:15-16:00 on the 25th
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236 on the 24th and Hus R:240 on the 25th

3. Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes

Instructor: David Wästerfors, Lund University, Department of Sociology
Dates: 29 September and 1 October
Time: 9:15-12:00
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236

4. Digital Ethnography

Instructor: Martin Berg, Malmö University
Dates: 5, 6, 8 & 9 October (week 41)
Time: 13:15-17:00
Format: Campus-based on 5, 6 & 9 October and online on 8 October
Location: Hus R:240 on 5, 6 & 9 October

5. Qualitative Analysis and Coding using NVivo

Instructor: Tullia Jack, Aalborg University, Department of Sociology
Dates: 19–23 October (week 43), PC/Mac groups split into mornings and afternoons
Time: 9:15-12:00 (PC group) and 13:15-16:00 (Mac group)
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:240


Multi-method workshop:

6. Gathering Data Online: Web-scraping

Instructors: Michael Bossetta, Lund University, Department of Media and Communications and Dylan Pashley
Dates: 28 September–2 October (week 40)
Time: 13:15-16:00
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236


Quantitative methods workshops:

7. Introduction to R Software 

Instructor: Irina Vartanova, Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm
Dates: 5–9 October (week 41)
Time: 9:15-12:00
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:240

8. Basic Statistics: refresher course

Instructor: Zoltan Kekecs , Lund University, Department of Psychology; ELTE
Dates: 12–16 October (week 42)
Time: 13:15-16:00
Format: Online

9. Social Network Analysis with R (co-sponsored by COMPUTE)

Instructor: Hernan Mondani, Stockholm University, Institute for Futures Studies
Dates: 12–16 October (week 42)
Time: 9:15-12:00
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:240

10. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks and Deep Learning (co-sponsored by COMPUTE)

Instructor: Mattias Ohlsson and Patrik Eden, Lund University, Computational Biology and Biological Physics
Dates: 26–27 October
Time: 9:15-12:00 and 13:15-16:00
Location: Ed:129

11. Introduction to Natural Language Processing and Text Mining (co-sponsored by COMPUTE)

Instructor: Johan Frid, Lund University Humanities Lab
Dates: 28–29 October
Time: 9:15-12:00 and 13:15-16:00
Location: Ed:129
 

Click here to sign up for the workshops that you are interested in attending. The deadline is 28 August 2020. We will get back to you whether you get a spot or not in the workshop(s) in early September.

Please direct any unanswered questions related to the content of the workshops to christopher [dot] swader [at] soc [dot] lu [dot] se and questions related to practical concerns to buleza [dot] emerllahu [at] sam [dot] lu [dot] se or yagmur [dot] yilmaz [at] sam [dot] lu [dot] se.


Workshop descriptions

1. Interpreting Interview Excerpts

Instructor: Malin Åkerström, Lund University, Department of Sociology
Dates: 21–22 September
Time: 13:15-16:00 on the 21st / 13:00-15:45 on the 22nd
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236

Abstract: The social sciences are full of good arguments for including people’s voices into our research projects. We encourage one another to collect and generate personal narratives, descriptions, accounts and dialogues by interviewing individuals in the settings we want to explore. But the actual reading of the transcripts that our interviewing practices produce is not always discussed or cultivated.

This workshop is devoted to sharpening our eyes for what we can find in interview transcripts: the useful descriptions, the telling details, the moral accounts, the stories and the metaphors employed – even the ”silence” or implicit content between the lines.

We start by discussing some texts that provide different analytic strategies, such as traditional thematic analyses, interviews as interactions, and narrative analysis.

Then we work in groups with excerpts that the participants bring to the workshop. The workshop leader may also present some interview excerpts if some participants are not able to contribute.

During the first occasion the participants "brainstorm" about excerpts; they discuss various interesting qualities, utterances, themes they observe, etc. Does the material promise opportunities for surprising findings?

During the second occasion we discuss different analytic opportunities. Which qualities do different analytic strategies allow the researcher to observe? Can they be interrelated? Can we dig out more findings through combining a thematic analysis with a narrative analysis, and simultaneously acknowledging the interview as an interactional accomplishment?

Malin Åkerström is Professor in Sociology at the Department of Sociology, Lund University, Sweden. Her research work focuses on qualitative studies of social control and deviance, and recently on modern meeting cultures.
 

2. Critical Ethnography

Instructor: Helle Rydström, Lund University, Department of Gender Studies
Dates: 24–25 September
Time: 9:15-12:00 and 13:15-16:00 on the 24th / 9:00-11.45 and 13:15-16:00 on the 25th
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236 on the 24th / Hus R:240 on the 25th

Abstract: The ethnographic method has gained traction in the social sciences and has become an integrated component of virtually all social science disciplines. Yet, it is often opaque what is meant by ethnography, an ethnographic method, and ethnographic fieldwork.

This workshop critically considers ethnography as a method, as a practice, and as an analytical tool. The workshop aims at first re-conceptualizing the epistemologies and ontologies of ethnographic fieldwork, and second, processing ethnographic data gathered by the aid of various in-depth techniques such as observations, interviews, narratives, memories, testimonies, focus group discussions, questionnaires, and archival material.

Drawing on participants’ fieldwork experiences, plans, and findings, the workshop will explore:

  1. Preparing ethnographic fieldwork.
  2. Collecting ethnographic data.
  3. Analyzing ethnographic material.
  4. Translating ethnographic findings into text.     

Whether ethnographic fieldwork is conducted on the ground or virtually, questions are generated in connection with the researcher ‘going there’, ‘being there’, ‘leaving’, and ‘returning’. These issues will be addressed at the workshop by examining ethnographic knowledge production, representation, and ethics as well as experiences, encounters, and emotions.

The workshop unfolds ethnographic fieldwork against the backdrop of decolonial and postcolonial scholarship and debates to understand the socio-political aspects of ethnography in a global world and how parameters such as gender, age, class, ethnicity, and sexuality inform ethnographic practices. In doing so, the workshop critically reflects upon the challenges which ethnographic fieldwork might impose upon those involved; whether it is an intrusive way of collecting data; could be carried out collaboratively; and whether ethnographic fieldwork could be an act of solidarity.

Helle Rydström is Professor at the Department of Gender Studies at Lund University. She has a background in Social Anthropology and International Development Studies. Rydström’s experience also includes Thematic Research; Political Science; and Southeast Asian Studies. She has been the scientific coordinator of the CRISIS Theme at the Pufendorf Institute for Advanced Studies and for a large number of funded research projects on Asia, all of which have included ethnographic fieldwork.
 

3. Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes

Instructor: David Wästerfors, Lund University, Department of Sociology
Dates: 29 September and 1 October
Time: 9:15-12:00
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236

Abstract: This workshop – two mornings-- is devoted to discussing and trying out ethnographic fieldnotes. The purpose is not to define any exact or strictly scheduled way, but to sensitize ourselves to seeing, listening and relating to other people for research purposes, and to identify aspects in a given social science project that might be able to be elaborated with the help of observations.
During the first morning, some texts are discussed: Emerson et al.'s book 'Writing ethnographic fieldnotes' and Marie Buscatto’s chapter 'Doing Ethnography: Ways and Reasons.' The idea is to show the breadth of ethnographic ways of working, as well as communicating some useful advice. A chapter written by the workshop leader will also be presented, which begins like this:

Qualitative researchers often need observations of people, their actions and settings, but apart from that general direction it is hard to pinpoint a superior kind of observational data. What to observe, and how, depends on the project. In this chapter I will try to show how the preferable kind of observations is a highly varied category. Then I will argue that there are still particular and quite fundamental qualities to strive for, even though every project is distinctive in its character.

The participants are then encouraged to try out this method – i. e. writing some notes -- on their own, over a few hours or so, in whatever setting they like and have access to.
During the second morning, the participants bring an example of a fieldnote, preferable written by themselves. It can be very simple, taken from observations from public places or a work place, for instance, or it can more complex variants belonging to a project. We discuss the notes in groups. The workshop leader may also present notes if some participants are not able to contribute.

David Wästerfors is a sociologist and writer with a rich experience of fieldwork and analysis. His graduate studies took place at Lund University and at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, where he studied Self and Society (with Jack Katz and Jeffrey Prager) and Aesthetic Anthropology (with Maureen Mahon).
 

4. Digital Ethnography

Instructor: Martin Berg, Malmö University
Dates: 5–9 October (week 41)
Time: 13:15-16:00
Format: Campus-based on 5, 6 & 9 October and online on 8 October
Location: Hus R:240 on 5, 6 & 9 October

Abstract: This workshop engages with digital ethnography as a methodology, and as a set of methods. Over four days, participants will learn about the principles and practices of digital ethnography with a particular focus on the challenges and opportunities of doing ethnographic research in a mediatised and data-saturated world. The workshop includes intense ethnographic exercises along with collaborative analysis sessions in which we will look closer at our empirical materials through the prisms of media technologies and media practices. There will be extensive opportunities to relate to ongoing and planned research topics.

Martin Berg holds a doctorate in sociology from Lund University (2008), a tenured professorship (biträdande professor) in media technology, and an associate professorship (docent) in sociology at Malmö university. Currently, he is the methodological leader of Malmö University's research program ’Data Society: Advancing Digitalisation Studies’ that he also co-directs. In addition, Berg leads the international research network ’Re-humanising Automated Decision-Making’ (funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond). His recent publications include ”Imagining Personal Data: Experiences of Self-Tracking" (Routledge, 2020) and, in Swedish, "Netnografi: att forska om och med internet” (Studentlitteratur, 2015). Currently, he’s working on a book manuscript on digital methods that is set to be published in 2021. 
 

5. Qualitative Analysis and Coding using NVivo

Instructor: Tullia Jack, Aalborg University, Department of the Built Environment, Sustainable Cities and Everyday Practice Research.
Dates: 19–23 October (week 43), PC/Mac groups split into mornings and afternoons
Time: 9:15-12:00 (PC group) / 13:15-16:00 (Mac group)
Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:240

Abstract: Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software packages are promising for assisting with the analysis of qualitative data. But how to make the most of their potential? NVivo software is currently available for use for all Lund University researchers and teachers. This workshop will demonstrate how NVivo can help to address qualitative research problems, both in the abstract and via practical exercises. Over five half day sessions the workshop will familiarise participants with the NVivo interface, importing and coding various file types, cases and classifications, visualising data as well as running queries. These hands-on exercises will explore how NVivo can - not only store and sort data - but help you to make sense of empirical material, look for patterns and systematically illuminate your research questions.

Tullia Jack got through her PhD in sociology with quite some help from NVivo. Following graduation she spent some extra time experimenting with NVivo's capabilities, and after delivering various NVivo courses she is more convinced of NVivo's usefulness in organising, comparing and drilling into different qualitative data sets.
 

6. Gathering Data Online: Web-scraping

Instructors: Michael Bossetta, Lund University, Department of Media and Communications and Dylan Pashley
Dates: 28 September–2 October (week 40)
Time: 13:15-16:00
​​​​​​​Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:236

Abstract: As communication increasingly moves online, the internet offers a wealth of data for social science research. This 3-day workshop will introduce participants to the basics of web scraping, so that data harvested from the internet can be incorporated into future research designs. Participants will learn about the back-end of website structure, and how both text and images can be harvested from it. The bulk of the workshop will be dedicated to training participants in web scraping, and we will compare the performance of browser plug-ins and the programming software 'R.' Participants will scrape websites relevant for their own research and discuss possible applications of this data for their own research projects. Programming experience is helpful but not necessary.

Michael Bossetta is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Media and Communication. His research interests revolve around the intersection of social media and politics. He is currently working on a project that uses web scraping to extract political campaign images from the Facebook Ad Library, and will share some of the approaches used to approach images-as-data at the workshop. 
 

7. Introduction to R Software 

Instructor: Irina Vartanova, Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm
Dates: 5–9 October (week 41)
Time: 9:15-12:00
​​​​​​​Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:240

Abstract: The workshop provides an introduction to R programming language for statistical data analysis in social sciences. R is an increasingly popular scientific tool and often becomes the first-choice software for implementing newly developed statistical methods. The main goal of the workshop is that participants learn the basic functionality of R language that covers the full cycle of statistical data analysis including data loading, pre-processing, visualisation, modelling, and communication of the results. The workshop is focused on the “tidyverse” collection of packages which are designed not just for the machine to execute but also for humans to read and thus are intuitive and easier to learn. The practical work is based on real data problems and prepares participants for a whole range of diverse data analysis tasks.

Irina Vartanova is a researcher at the Institute for Futures Studies. Having completed a PhD in psychology, she applies her data analysis expertise to working in an interdisciplinary environment and collaborating with colleagues from different fields. She specializes in advanced statistical and computational methods in social research and has a lot of experience in analyzing large survey data. Her research primarily focuses on social norms and how they change in different cultures. In her free time, she likes to learn new tricks to make her R code clearer and faster.
 

8. Basic Statistics: refresher course

Instructor: Zoltan Kekecs , Lund University, Department of Psychology; ELTE
Dates: 12–16 October (week 42)
Time: 13:15-16:00
​​​​​​​Format: Online

Abstract: This workshop is intended for those who do not primarily use quantitative methods in their research. It is designed to give you confidence when analyzing statistical results and when using basic statistical concepts and approaches. We will learn the foundational concepts in statistics such as descriptive statistics, probability, sample and sampling distributions, inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, and exploratory analysis. The workshop will also demonstrate the use of some of the fundamental statistical analyses that are most commonly used on the field to help the attendees interpret the results of these analyses. Importantly, there is no software knowledge required for this course!

Zoltan Kekecs is an assistant professor at ELTE, and a part-time senior lecturer at Lund University. He completed a PhD in Psychology, and went on to do research on the use of psychological interventions in medicine and patient safety, working together with psychologists, medical doctors, and data scientists. He is a methodologist within the Psychological Science Accelerator (PSA), a globally distributed network of over 500 psychological science laboratories. He is interested in devising methods to improve the credibility of scientific reports.
 

9. Social Network Analysis with R

Instructor: Hernan Mondani, Stockholm University, Institute for Futures Studies
Dates: 12–16 October (week 42)
Time: 9:15-12:00
​​​​​​​Format: Campus-based
Location: Hus R:240

Abstract: Networks are ubiquitous in the social world. Essentially all forms of social action are embedded in one or more networks whose structure and dynamics can be very complex. This workshop provides an introduction to social network analysis with R. After a brief introduction about networks in general and social networks in particular, we will learn basic structural and dynamical measures to characterize social networks. We will go through some basic R packages for the analysis of networks, like sna, as well as some more advanced packages for the implementation of relatively more advanced models like exponential random graph models and stochastic actor-oriented models.

Hernan Mondani holds a PhD in sociology from Stockholm University. He is a researcher at Stockholm University and the Institute for Futures Studies. Mondani has a background in engineering physics and a general research interest in modelling social phenomena using large-scale datasets and non-traditional quantitative methods. His research is mainly concerned with social network models of organizing processes, particularly applied to the dynamics of criminal organizing and collaboration. At Stockholm University, he also uses life-course trajectory analysis to study migrants and neighbourhood segregation dynamics in Sweden.

Note: This event is co-sponsored by COMPUTE, a Lund University research school dedicated to scientific discovery using computers.
 

10. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Instructor: Mattias Ohlsson and Patrik Eden, Lund University, Computational Biology and Biological Physics
Dates: 26–27 October
Time: 9:15-12:00 and 13:15-16:00
Location: Ed:129

Note: This event is co-sponsored by COMPUTE, a Lund University research school dedicated to scientific discovery using computers.
 

11. Introduction to Natural Language Processing and Text Mining

Instructor: Johan Frid, Lund University Humanities Lab
Dates: 28–29 October
Time: 9:15-12:00 and 13:15-16:00
Location: Ed:129

Abstract: Natural language processing is a special kind of linguistic analysis that essentially helps a machine interpret text. Text mining is the process or practice of examining large collections of written resources in order to generate new information. Text mining is being used in many diverse settings: to identify trends in social media, explore narratives in literature and historical discourse, and to discover drug–drug interactions in medical texts. This workshop aims to give an introduction to quantitative methods for analysing text. We will illustrate a few tools, resources and workflows, including word embeddings, text clustering and binary text classification.

Johan Frid is a researcher in speech and language technology at the Humanities Lab. His focus is on language resources, to develop tools, methods and infrastructure for collecting, exploring and analyzing language data. He is the local coordinator of Swe-Clarin, the national infrastructure for language technology.

Note: This event is co-sponsored by COMPUTE, a Lund University research school dedicated to scientific discovery using computers.